Meaher, Augustine, III Attorney

107 St. Francis Street Suite 2118 Mobile Alabama, 36602

(251)432-9971

(251)432-9978

ameaheriii(at)earthlink.net

Specialties of Meaher, Augustine, III Attorney:
  • Attorneys
  • Civil Law Attorneys
  • Corporate Business Lawyers
  • Corporate Finance & Securities Lawyers
  • Disability Lawyers
Attorneys: A lawyer is a person who practices law, as an advocate, barrister, attorney, counselor or solicitor or chartered legal executive. Working as a lawyer involves the practical application of abstract legal theories and knowledge to solve specific individualized problems, or to advance the interests of those who hire lawyers to perform legal services. The role of the lawyer varies greatly across legal jurisdictions, and so it can be treated here in only the most general terms.
Civil Law Attorneys: Many states in the world have comprehensive legal systems called civil law jurisdictions, largely inspired by Roman law, the primary feature of which was that laws were written into a collection; codified, and not determined, as is common law, by judges. Germany and France sustained the bridge between Roman law and civil law (old French law book cover pictured). Civil law jurisdictions purport to provide all citizens with an accessible and written collection of the laws which apply to them and which judges must follow.
Corporate Business Lawyers: A corporate lawyer is also known as In-House Counsel, Staff Attorney, Deputy General Counsel, General Counsel and Chief Legal Officer. Their primary objective is to serve the interests of the corporation, not the owners of the business or the officers who run it. In addition to legal counsel, they may also be called upon to provide business advice. They may practice other areas of law concerning mergers and acquisitions, trademarks, tax law bankruptcy, employment, securities, real estate or international commercial law.
Disability Lawyers: Disability law is largely regulated by the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990. This Act prohibits discrimination against individuals with disabilities in employment, housing, education, and access to public services. The ADA defines a disability as any of the following: "a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more of the major life activities of the individual.", "a record of such impairment." or "being regarded as having such an impairment." While alcoholism is included as a disability, other socially undesirable behavior is excluded from the Act. For example, sexual behavior disorders, compulsive gambling, and pyromania are all excluded. The ADA, however, does not list all impairments covered. The ADA further requires that reasonable accomodation be made so as to provide individuals with disabilities equal opportunities. Agenices and departments charged with enforcement of the ADA include the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) and the Department of Justice.

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