Scaramastra, Donald B. Attorney

Scaramastra, Donald B. Attorney from Seattle Washington works as Administrative & Governmental Lawyers, Appeals Lawyers, and Trial Lawyers. Feel free to contact us at the following contact information.

1191 Second Avenue 18th Floor Seattle Washington, 98101
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(206)464-3939

(206)464-0125

www.GSBlaw.com

dscar(at)gsblaw.com

Specialties of Scaramastra, Donald B. Attorney:
  • Administrative & Governmental Lawyers
  • Appeals Lawyers
  • Trial Lawyers
Administrative & Governmental Lawyers: Administrative law is the body of law that governs the activities of administrative agencies of government. Government agency action can include rulemaking, adjudication, or the enforcement of a specific regulatory agenda. Administrative law is considered a branch of public law. As a body of law, administrative law deals with the decision-making of administrative units of government (for example, tribunals, boards or commissions) that are part of a national regulatory scheme in such areas as police law, international trade, manufacturing, the environment, taxation, broadcasting, immigration and transport. Administrative law expanded greatly during the twentieth century, as legislative bodies worldwide created more government agencies to regulate the social, economic and political spheres of human interaction.
Appeals Lawyers: A challenge to a previous legal determination. An appeal is directed towards a legal power higher than the power making the challenged determination. In most states and the federal system, trial court determinations can be appealed in appeals courts, and appeals court decisions can be appealed in a supreme court. The person pursuing an appeal is called an appellant, while the person defending the lower court’s ruling is the appellee. Appeals can be either discretionary or of right. An appeal of right is one that the higher court must hear, if the losing party demands it, while a discretionary appeal is one that the higher court may, but does not have to, consider. For example, in the federal system, there is an appeal of right from the District Court to the Court of Appeals, but appeals from the Court of Appeals to the Supreme Court are discretionary.

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