Tuenge, Peter O. Attorney

Tuenge, Peter O. Attorney from Portland Oregon works as Appeals Lawyers, Attorneys, Malpractice & Negligence Lawyers, and Medical Malpractice Lawyers. Feel free to contact us at the following contact information.

One Southwest Columbia Portland Oregon, 97258
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(503)222-9955

(503)796-0699

Specialties of Tuenge, Peter O. Attorney:
  • Appeals Lawyers
  • Attorneys
  • Malpractice & Negligence Lawyers
  • Medical Malpractice Lawyers
Appeals Lawyers: A challenge to a previous legal determination. An appeal is directed towards a legal power higher than the power making the challenged determination. In most states and the federal system, trial court determinations can be appealed in appeals courts, and appeals court decisions can be appealed in a supreme court. The person pursuing an appeal is called an appellant, while the person defending the lower court’s ruling is the appellee. Appeals can be either discretionary or of right. An appeal of right is one that the higher court must hear, if the losing party demands it, while a discretionary appeal is one that the higher court may, but does not have to, consider. For example, in the federal system, there is an appeal of right from the District Court to the Court of Appeals, but appeals from the Court of Appeals to the Supreme Court are discretionary.
Attorneys: A lawyer is a person who practices law, as an advocate, barrister, attorney, counselor or solicitor or chartered legal executive. Working as a lawyer involves the practical application of abstract legal theories and knowledge to solve specific individualized problems, or to advance the interests of those who hire lawyers to perform legal services. The role of the lawyer varies greatly across legal jurisdictions, and so it can be treated here in only the most general terms.
Medical Malpractice Lawyers: Medical malpractice law in the United States is derived from English common law, and was developed by rulings in various state courts. Medical malpractice lawsuits are a relatively common occurrence in the United States. The legal system is designed to encourage extensive discovery and negotiations between adversarial parties with the goal of resolving the dispute without going to jury trial. The injured patient must show that the physician acted negligently in rendering care, and that such negligence resulted in injury. To do so, four legal elements must be proven: (1) a professional duty owed to the patient; (2) breach of such duty; (3) injury caused by the breach; and (4) resulting damages. Money damages, if awarded, typically take into account both actual economic loss and noneconomic loss, such as pain and suffering.

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