Peterson, Johnson & Murray, S.C.

Peterson, Johnson & Murray, S.C. from Pleasant Prairie Wisconsin works as Administrative & Governmental Lawyers, Appeals Lawyers, Arbitration & Mediation Services, Arbitration & Mediation Services Attorneys, Attorneys, Corporate Business Lawyers, and Disability Lawyers. Feel free to contact us at the following contact information.

10505 Corporate Drive Suite 102 Pleasant Prairie Wisconsin, 53158
[Open in Maps]

(262)857-4520

(262)857-4160

pjm(at)pjmlaw.com

Specialties of Peterson, Johnson & Murray, S.C.:
  • Administrative & Governmental Lawyers
  • Appeals Lawyers
  • Arbitration & Mediation Services
  • Arbitration & Mediation Services Attorneys
  • Attorneys
  • Corporate Business Lawyers
  • Disability Lawyers
Administrative & Governmental Lawyers: Administrative law is the body of law that governs the activities of administrative agencies of government. Government agency action can include rulemaking, adjudication, or the enforcement of a specific regulatory agenda. Administrative law is considered a branch of public law. As a body of law, administrative law deals with the decision-making of administrative units of government (for example, tribunals, boards or commissions) that are part of a national regulatory scheme in such areas as police law, international trade, manufacturing, the environment, taxation, broadcasting, immigration and transport. Administrative law expanded greatly during the twentieth century, as legislative bodies worldwide created more government agencies to regulate the social, economic and political spheres of human interaction.
Appeals Lawyers: A challenge to a previous legal determination. An appeal is directed towards a legal power higher than the power making the challenged determination. In most states and the federal system, trial court determinations can be appealed in appeals courts, and appeals court decisions can be appealed in a supreme court. The person pursuing an appeal is called an appellant, while the person defending the lower court’s ruling is the appellee. Appeals can be either discretionary or of right. An appeal of right is one that the higher court must hear, if the losing party demands it, while a discretionary appeal is one that the higher court may, but does not have to, consider. For example, in the federal system, there is an appeal of right from the District Court to the Court of Appeals, but appeals from the Court of Appeals to the Supreme Court are discretionary.
Arbitration & Mediation Services: Arbitration is an alternative means of setttling a dispute by impartial persons without proceeding to a court trial. It is sometimes preferred as a means of settling a matter in ordert to avoid the expense, delay, and acrimony of litigation. There is no discovery and there are simplified rules of evidence in arbitration. The arbitrator or arbitrators are selected directly by the parties or are chosen in accordance with the terms of a contract in which the parties have agreed to use a court-ordered arbitrator or an arbitrator from the American Arbitration Association. If there is no contract, usually each party chooses an arbitrator and the two arbitrators select a third to comprise the panel. When parties submit to arbitration, they agree to be bound by and comply with the arbitrators' decision. The arbitrators' decision is given after an informal proceeding where each side presents evidence and witnesses. Arbitration hearings usually last only a few hours and the opinions are not public record. Arbitration has long been used in labor, construction, and securities regulation, but is now gaining popularity in other business disputes.
Arbitration & Mediation Services Attorneys: Arbitration is an alternative means of setttling a dispute by impartial persons without proceeding to a court trial. It is sometimes preferred as a means of settling a matter in ordert to avoid the expense, delay, and acrimony of litigation. There is no discovery and there are simplified rules of evidence in arbitration. The arbitrator or arbitrators are selected directly by the parties or are chosen in accordance with the terms of a contract in which the parties have agreed to use a court-ordered arbitrator or an arbitrator from the American Arbitration Association. If there is no contract, usually each party chooses an arbitrator and the two arbitrators select a third to comprise the panel. When parties submit to arbitration, they agree to be bound by and comply with the arbitrators' decision. The arbitrators' decision is given after an informal proceeding where each side presents evidence and witnesses. Arbitration hearings usually last only a few hours and the opinions are not public record. Arbitration has long been used in labor, construction, and securities regulation, but is now gaining popularity in other business disputes.
Attorneys: A lawyer is a person who practices law, as an advocate, barrister, attorney, counselor or solicitor or chartered legal executive. Working as a lawyer involves the practical application of abstract legal theories and knowledge to solve specific individualized problems, or to advance the interests of those who hire lawyers to perform legal services. The role of the lawyer varies greatly across legal jurisdictions, and so it can be treated here in only the most general terms.
Corporate Business Lawyers: A corporate lawyer is also known as In-House Counsel, Staff Attorney, Deputy General Counsel, General Counsel and Chief Legal Officer. Their primary objective is to serve the interests of the corporation, not the owners of the business or the officers who run it. In addition to legal counsel, they may also be called upon to provide business advice. They may practice other areas of law concerning mergers and acquisitions, trademarks, tax law bankruptcy, employment, securities, real estate or international commercial law.
Disability Lawyers: Disability law is largely regulated by the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990. This Act prohibits discrimination against individuals with disabilities in employment, housing, education, and access to public services. The ADA defines a disability as any of the following: "a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more of the major life activities of the individual.", "a record of such impairment." or "being regarded as having such an impairment." While alcoholism is included as a disability, other socially undesirable behavior is excluded from the Act. For example, sexual behavior disorders, compulsive gambling, and pyromania are all excluded. The ADA, however, does not list all impairments covered. The ADA further requires that reasonable accomodation be made so as to provide individuals with disabilities equal opportunities. Agenices and departments charged with enforcement of the ADA include the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) and the Department of Justice.

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